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Relativism

Hearing the Voice of God

by Bishop Robert Barron . July 14, 2019 .

During the twentieth century, moral relativism was in vogue in elite cultural circles, but now it is the dominant moral outlook of the broader culture. Against this, C.S. Lewis argued for “the universality and inescapability of the moral law.” Although there are subtle moral differences between cultures, if we look close enough, we can discern fundamental moral agreements. The Catholic tradition says that this moral bedrock is a reflection of the Eternal Law in the mind of God. It is the voice of God within us. Listen to that voice.

All Sinners Are Welcome!

by Bishop Robert Barron . July 24, 2018 .

While I was in central Georgia, filming the Flannery O’Connor episode of my Pivotal Players series, I saw a sign on the outside of a church, which would have delighted the famously prickly Catholic author: “All Sinners Are Welcome!” I thought it was a wonderfully Christian spin on the etiquette of welcome that is so pervasive in our culture today. In a time of almost complete ethical relativism, the one value that everyone seems to accept is inclusivity, and the only disvalue that everyone seems to abhor is exclusivity. What I especially liked about the sign in Georgia was that it compels us to make some distinctions and think a bit more precisely about this contemporary moral consensus.

¡Bienvenidos Todos Los Pecadores!

by Bishop Robert Barron . July 23, 2018 .

Mientras estaba en Georgia, filmando el episodio de Flannery O’Connor para mi serie Pivotal Players, vi un cartel a la salida de una Iglesia que le hubiera encantado a la famosa y escabrosa escritora católica: “¡Bienvenidos todos los pecadores!” Me pareció que era un precioso giro cristiano al lema de acogida que impregna nuestra cultura actual. En un tiempo de casi total relativismo moral, el único valor que todos parecen aceptar es la inclusividad, y lo único que todos parecen aborrecer es la exclusividad. Lo que me gustó especialmente del cartel en Georgia es que nos obliga a hacer ciertas distinciones y a pensar con un poco más de precisión sobre el consenso moral de nuestros tiempos.

The High Priestly Prayer

by Bishop Robert Barron . May 13, 2018 .

As the Easter season draws to a close, we hear from one of the most magnificent passages in the Gospel of John—namely, the high priestly prayer of Jesus the night of the Last Supper. It is by far the longest discourse by Jesus anywhere in the New Testament, and it contains the seeds of Christian spirituality in its entirety.

Michelle Wolf and the Throwaway Culture

by Bishop Robert Barron . May 1, 2018 .

At this year’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner, the comedian Michelle Wolf joked about "knocking around" unborn children, in order to abort them. Her shameless endorsement of abortion places her in line with Friedrich Nietzsche, who had a special contempt for the Christian values of sympathy and compassion for the vulnerable and believed all morality was relative. But if Wolf and Nietzsche are right—if good and evil are merely relative states of affairs—then there is nothing to hem in and control the tendency of cultural elites to dominate others. When objective moral values evanesce, armies of the expendable emerge.