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The Earthquake and the Light

by Bishop Robert Barron . March 31, 2002 .

In Matthew's version of the Easter story, symbols of novelty and transformation abound: it is the first day of the week, light is dawning, a stone has been rolled back, the very earth shakes, and an angel, a bearer of light, comes and speaks a word of hope. Easter is the day when everything changed, when God's mercy turned the world as we know it upside-down. We Christians are the proclaimers of this reversal.

The Man Born Blind

by Bishop Robert Barron . March 10, 2002 .

Blindness is a great Biblical symbol of spiritual blindness, the darkening and distortion of our vision. Jesus salves and washes the blind man in John's Gospel in order to restore his sight. In the same way, he washes us (in Baptism) and salves us (in the other sacraments) so that we might see with his eyes.

That Mysterious Light

by Bishop Robert Barron . February 24, 2002 .

On the mount of Transfiguration, Jesus becomes brilliantly illumined. This light signals the radiance and beauty of a world beyond this one, a dimension from which Jesus has come and to which he is luring us.

Jesus in the Desert

by Bishop Robert Barron . February 17, 2002 .

Just after his baptism, Jesus retires to the wilderness and there he faces the tempter. We enter into this experience with him, facing the same struggle. Like the Lord himself, we wrestle with the temptations to make sensual pleasure, the ego, and power the center of our lives. In resisting all three, we make the acceptance of God's will and mission possible.

Pray, Fast, and Give Alms

by Bishop Robert Barron . February 10, 2002 .

During the great season of Lent, the Church recommends three very concrete acts: prayer, fasting, and the giving of alms. These are actions that involve the body as much as the mind; and they are things that we "do." Lent is not so much a time to fuss about one's "interiority" as a time to get going!"

The Program for Freedom

by Bishop Robert Barron . February 3, 2002 .

At the beginning of the Sermon on the Mount, we hear the eight beatitudes. These are a summons to be liberated from the various addictions--to material things, to power, to good feeling, to the esteem of others--that keep us from following the will of God.

The Irresistable Call

by Bishop Robert Barron . January 27, 2002 .

When Jesus calls his first disciples, he stirs the "imago Dei," the image of God, in them. They realize that they will find themselves only in surrendering to the one who will make them fishers of men. We hear the same call from the same Christ.

The Disquieting Humility of God

by Bishop Robert Barron . January 20, 2002 .

John hesitates before baptizing the Lord, saying, "It is I who should be baptized by you." The great surprise--that we have been wrestling with for two millenia--is that God's greatness is a function of his humility, his willingness to stand shoulder to shoulder in the muck of sin with the likes of us. That we have such a God, a friend of sinners, is the reason for our hope.

An Icon of the Trinity

by Bishop Robert Barron . January 13, 2002 .

The scene of the baptism of Jesus described in the Gospel of Matthew is a theophany, a showing forth of the being of God. The Father crying out from heaven; the Son standing in the water with us sinners; the Spirit hovering.

The Journey of the Magi

by Bishop Robert Barron . January 6, 2002 .

The journey of these wise men is a metaphor for the spiritual journeys that all of us must make. Like the magi, we must be attentive; we must be willing to act; we must expect opposition; we must give our best to Christ, and finally, we must be willing to change, "to go back by a different route."

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